Plas Teg, Clwyd, North Wales, (50" x 32").
       
     
The Laskett Gardens, (42" x 30").
       
     
Llanfendigaid, Towyn, Wales. (42" x 30")
       
     
Llanfendigaid. Oils on gessoed panel, (14" x 12").
       
     
Burghley House from the West, Lincolnshire (48" x 30).
       
     
Burghley House from the South, (48" x 32").
       
     
Nanhoron, Anglesea, Wales.
       
     
Stowe Landscape Gardens, Pen & Ink, (33" x 23").
       
     
Detail of Stowe Map; 'Temple of Ancient Virtue'
       
     
Crest - Stowe Landscape Gardens Map
       
     
Detail of Stowe Map - Temple of Ancient Worthies
       
     
Adlestrop Park, Gloucestershire.
       
     
Gresgarth Hall, Lancashire.
       
     
Detail of the Kitchen Garden, Gresgarth.
       
     
The Queen's Temple, Stowe, (22" x 18").
       
     
Temple of Ancient Virtue, Stowe, (22" x 18").
       
     
Giffords Hall, Suffolk
       
     
The Deer Tower, Sussex, (42" x 30").
       
     
The Deer Tower, Shillinglee Park, West Sussex
       
     
Stoke Priory, Suffolk (42" x 30").
       
     
Oil-sketch of Stanage Park, Powys, Wales, (12" x 9")
       
     
Stanage Park, Powys, Wales, (48" x 32").
       
     
Detail of Stanage Park.
       
     
Close-up of 'Stanage Park'.
       
     
Daneway, Gloucestershire.
       
     
Huys de Dohm, Heerlen, The Netherlands, (48" x 36").
       
     
Hanbury Hall, Hereford & Worcester. (42" x 30").
       
     
Somerleyton Hall, Norfolk, (48" x 36"), 1998.
       
     
somerleton+detail+web.jpg
       
     
Detail of the maze at Somerleyton, 1998.
       
     
Maybanks House, West Sussex
       
     
Plas Teg, Clwyd, North Wales, (50" x 32").
       
     
Plas Teg, Clwyd, North Wales, (50" x 32").

The house was built by Sir John Trevor I, a prominent courtier of King James I, in about 1610.

By the early-1950s, Plas Teg was in a state of advanced decay and under threat of demolition, although a Grade 1 listing from Cadw, protected it from demolition. A Trevor descendant, Patrick Trevor-Roper, purchased the house and partially restored it with funds from the Historic Buildings Council. Then, in 1986 the present owner, Cornelia Bayley acquired Plas Teg and lovingly restored it.

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The Laskett Gardens, (42" x 30").
       
     
The Laskett Gardens, (42" x 30").

The Laskett Gardens in Herefordshire border are the creation of Sir Roy Strong CH and his late wife Julia Trevelyan Oman. The gardens were begun in 1974 and continue to evolve. Jonathan Myles-Lea lived in ‘The Folly’, a gothicised 18th century cottage within the gardens between 2011-2013, although he created this oil-painting in 1995. His connection with the gardens continues to the present day.

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Llanfendigaid, Towyn, Wales. (42" x 30")
       
     
Llanfendigaid, Towyn, Wales. (42" x 30")

The Llanfendigaid Estate, located on the Cardigan Bay coast of southern Gwynedd (formerly Merioneth), near Tywyn in north Wales is a mid-Georgian house that has belonged to the same family for over 600 years. William Garton-Jones commissioned this painting of the house in which Myles-Lea has created dramatic lighting effects reminiscent of the works of the Dutch artist Salomen van Ruisdael.

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Llanfendigaid. Oils on gessoed panel, (14" x 12").
       
     
Llanfendigaid. Oils on gessoed panel, (14" x 12").

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Burghley House from the West, Lincolnshire (48" x 30).
       
     
Burghley House from the West, Lincolnshire (48" x 30).

Burghley was built for Sir William Cecil, later 1st Baron Burghley, who was Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I of England, between 1558 and 1587. It was subsequently the residence of his descendants, the Earls, and since 1801, the Marquesses of Exeter. Since 1961, it has been owned by a charitable trust established by the family and the current residents are Miranda and Orlando Rock and their family.

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Burghley House from the South, (48" x 32").
       
     
Burghley House from the South, (48" x 32").

Burghley is one of the largest and grandest houses of the first Elizabethan Age It was built and mostly designed by William Cecil, Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I, between 1555 and 1587, the main part of the House has 35 major rooms on the ground and first floors with more than 80 lesser rooms and numerous halls, corridors, bathrooms and service areas.

The Burghley House Preservation Trust Limited was established as a charity in 1969 by the Sixth Marquess of Exeter and it is still occupied by descendants of the 1st Lord Burghley.

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Nanhoron, Anglesea, Wales.
       
     
Nanhoron, Anglesea, Wales.

A small oil-sketch on gessoed linen laid on panel as a preparatory study for a larger painting.

Stowe Landscape Gardens, Pen & Ink, (33" x 23").
       
     
Stowe Landscape Gardens, Pen & Ink, (33" x 23").

Gervase Jasckon-Stops, the Head Advisor to The National Trust commissioned this map to commemorate the renovated of Stowe Landscape Gardens which covers 750 acres and includes 40 listed historic monuments and temples. It is considered one of England's earliest and most important landscape gardens and the greatest names in English garden design were involved in its creation.

Begun in the 1710s by garden designer Charles Bridgeman, architect John Vanbrugh and garden designers William Kent and James Gibbs participated in shaping it. Lancelot "Capability" Brown also had a hand in shaping it when he was head gardener there between 1741 and 1751.

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Detail of Stowe Map; 'Temple of Ancient Virtue'
       
     
Detail of Stowe Map; 'Temple of Ancient Virtue'

This box view from the map of Stowe shows the Temple of Ancient Virtue designed by William Kent in 1734. Two figures meet in a tryst on the path in the foreground. 

Crest - Stowe Landscape Gardens Map
       
     
Crest - Stowe Landscape Gardens Map

Jonathan designed this unique crest for Stowe which incorporates the Cobham family crest and motto: 'trempla quam delicta" (How beautiful are thy temples!"). The oak-leaf logo of the National Trust appears on a scroll being held by a boy (symbolising Stowe Boys School donating the landscape to the National Trust).

Detail of Stowe Map - Temple of Ancient Worthies
       
     
Detail of Stowe Map - Temple of Ancient Worthies

Designed by William Kent in 1734, the Temple of Ancient Worthies contains a series of niches for sixteen busts, eight in either wing, and a central oval niche for the head of Mercury. On the left are figures of contemplation: poets, philosophers, and scientists; on the right are figures of action: monarchs, statesmen, and warriors.


Adlestrop Park, Gloucestershire.
       
     
Adlestrop Park, Gloucestershire.

A small watercolour sketch in preparation for a larger oil. (14” x 9”). Adlestrop is a country house, and a former rectory, with integrated pleasure grounds and a landscape park of about 1800 by Humphry Repton.

Gresgarth Hall, Lancashire.
       
     
Gresgarth Hall, Lancashire.

The 12-acre garden created by Lady Arrabella Lennox-Boyd since 1978.

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Detail of the Kitchen Garden, Gresgarth.
       
     
Detail of the Kitchen Garden, Gresgarth.

Detail of the Walled Kitchen Garden at Gresgarth.

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The Queen's Temple, Stowe, (22" x 18").
       
     
The Queen's Temple, Stowe, (22" x 18").

The Queen’s Temple was originally designed by James Gibbs and built during 1742-48. It was then called the Lady’s Temple as it was designed for Lady Cobham to entertain her friends. It was reworked in Neoclassical style in the 1770s

Temple of Ancient Virtue, Stowe, (22" x 18").
       
     
Temple of Ancient Virtue, Stowe, (22" x 18").

Designed by William Kent in 1734, this monument is a peristyle rotunda, patterned after the Temple of Vesta at Tivoli but using the Ionic order rather than the Corinthian. Inside are four niches for full-length statues of Homer, Socrates, Lycurgus and Epaminondas,

Giffords Hall, Suffolk
       
     
Giffords Hall, Suffolk

The present house was mainly built by the Mannock family in the early C16 but incorporates the remains of an earlier building. The timber-framed house is built around a quadrangular courtyard with a 2 storeyed red brick gatehouse and a great hall. The outer front of the gatehouse has angle turrets, stepped battlements and brick pinnacles. The interior of the great hall has a fine example of a double-hammerbeam roof with carved arched braces and spandrels, and a late C17 minstrels gallery with twisted balusters.

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The Deer Tower, Sussex, (42" x 30").
       
     
The Deer Tower, Sussex, (42" x 30").

The Deer Tower was originally a verderer's look-out or an "eyecatcher" from Shillinglee Park, an 18th-century house and estate in West Sussex near the Surrey border. It was converted into a permanent dwelling by James and Clare Kirkman in the 1990s and they also created the quirky garden which surrounds it.

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The Deer Tower, Shillinglee Park, West Sussex
       
     
The Deer Tower, Shillinglee Park, West Sussex

A detail of the previous image.

Stoke Priory, Suffolk (42" x 30").
       
     
Stoke Priory, Suffolk (42" x 30").

Stoke Priory is owned by the descendants of the miniaturist George Engleheart.

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Oil-sketch of Stanage Park, Powys, Wales, (12" x 9")
       
     
Oil-sketch of Stanage Park, Powys, Wales, (12" x 9")

Stanage Park is a fine Welsh country house set in a large park near Knighton in Powys. The extensive parkland and the house were laid out by Humphry Repton and his son, John Adey Repton, in the early nineteenth century. Repton's picturesque parkland improvements, castellated house and enclosed garden survive almost intact. This is a small oil-sketch which Jonathan executed in preparation for the major oil he painted of Stanage.

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Stanage Park, Powys, Wales, (48" x 32").
       
     
Stanage Park, Powys, Wales, (48" x 32").

Stanage Park was built 1803–07 by the Reptons for Charles Rogers in a picturesque castle style that was explicitly modelled on Richard Payne Knight's Downton Castle. John Repton designed an addition to the rear of the house in 1822. John Hiram Haycock added bay windows and his son Edward Haycock Senior remodelled some of the public rooms in a Tudorbethan style in 1833. The plans for the Repton's work are recorded in a 'Red Book', still kept at the house.

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Detail of Stanage Park.
       
     
Detail of Stanage Park.

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Close-up of 'Stanage Park'.
       
     
Close-up of 'Stanage Park'.
Daneway, Gloucestershire.
       
     
Daneway, Gloucestershire.

Daneway is a mid-16th century house with later additions.

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Huys de Dohm, Heerlen, The Netherlands, (48" x 36").
       
     
Huys de Dohm, Heerlen, The Netherlands, (48" x 36").

The house dates from 1640 and the garden, created by Ineke Greve, is a series of new garden rooms in the Arts and Crafts Style. The rich planting and colour-co-ordinated herbaceous borders have made this one of the most famous gardens in The Netherlands.

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Hanbury Hall, Hereford & Worcester. (42" x 30").
       
     
Hanbury Hall, Hereford & Worcester. (42" x 30").

Hanbury Hall is a large 18th century Queen Anne house with an Orangery and a Long Gallery pavilion. It stands in extensive parkland in Worcestershire. A notable feature of Hanbury Hall is the painting of the staircase, hall ceiling, and other rooms by the English painter Sir James Thornhill. Jonathan was commissioned to paint this view of the property to commemorate the restoration of the formal gardens in 1997 and the painting is on public view at the property.

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Somerleyton Hall, Norfolk, (48" x 36"), 1998.
       
     
Somerleyton Hall, Norfolk, (48" x 36"), 1998.

Somerleyton Hall on Norfolk/Suffolk border was designed by William Andrews Nesfield in 1846. The ridge and furrow greenhouse was designed by Joseph Paxton, the architect of The Crystal Palace. There is also a maze, a walled garden, an aviary, a loggia and a 90-metre (300 ft) long pergola, covered with roses and wisteria.

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somerleton+detail+web.jpg
       
     
Detail of the maze at Somerleyton, 1998.
       
     
Detail of the maze at Somerleyton, 1998.
Maybanks House, West Sussex
       
     
Maybanks House, West Sussex

Commissioned by John and Sue Beckwith-Smith.

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